You Can Prevent Cavities With Lifestyle Changes… But You Still Need a Dentist

Updated on September 4, 2022 by Team ShineSheets

Teeth Care Set

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When dental problems come knocking, a lot of us shy away from the prospect of visiting a professional. This is not always a bad thing, as specific maladies can be fixed at home. However, in the long run, it’s crucial to see a dentist for both regular checkups as well as more urgent attention.

Let’s look at how this applies to a scenario where you’re suffering from cavities and also what small changes will improve your dental health significantly.

 

Dealing with the issue of cost

 

Fear of the dentist isn’t only down to the high-pitched whirring of drills and the prospect of local anesthetic; for plenty of people, it’s the financial burden that gives them pause and forces them to put up with cavities rather than seek treatment.

However, there are ways to make dentistry more affordable, such as by joining a dental health maintenance organization (DHMO). You can dig deeper on what a DHMO is, but the underlying concept is that instead of paying for treatment on-demand, you instead pay a regular insurance premium and get services inexpensively or even entirely free as needed.

With a DHMO on your side, you’ll also be able to justify those regular check-ups that allow small issues to be nipped in the bud early before they can grow and become more painful and expensive to remedy.

 

Altering your habits

 

As mentioned, it’s best to combine trips to the dentist with a better routine and better choices in your day-to-day life. So what are the best practices for minimizing the chances of getting cavities, as well as of dealing with a whole host of other issues from plaque build-up to gum disease and beyond?

 

1. Frequent brushing

 

The old adage of brushing your teeth after every meal still holds true, so getting into the habit of cleaning after breakfast, lunch, and your evening meal is a must if you aren’t doing this already.

 

2. Equipment choice

 

You shouldn’t cheap out on the brush you buy because this is an investment in dental health and not just a casual purchase. Electric toothbrush models are still the best for an all-around clean, and it’s also crucial to swap your brush, or brush head, regularly so that bacteria doesn’t build up over the weeks.

 

3. Diet

 

What you eat and drink matters, and if your teeth develop sensitivity to certain foods, it’s a wise move to avoid them until you’ve spoken to your dentist. They may recommend a specialist toothpaste to cope with this, although it could also be necessary to limit or stop your intake of specific items entirely. Foods that are high in sugar will cause cavities, while fresh fruits and vegetables are actually capable of counteracting this. Essentially, a healthy diet isn’t just about things like losing weight, but also keeping your teeth on point.

 

4. Mouthwash

 

Another tried and tested solution to poor dental health is the addition of mouthwash to your daily routine. Mouthwash, which comes with antibacterial qualities, is especially desirable. It can reach the parts of your mouth which aren’t accessible to the bristles of your brush and will sweep away any nastiness that would otherwise accumulate.

As with other products designed for dental hygiene, there are many mouthwashes on the market, and chatting to your dentists to see which they recommend will save you from having to compare and contrast them yourself.

 

Conclusion

 

Let’s face it, we could all stand to take better care of our teeth… You’ll be pleased about the small changes you make now in the long run, so don’t skip the dentist and don’t neglect your mouth!

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